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Western Word of the Week - Proddy - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Proddy - spoiling for a fight

Also called "on the prod".

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Museum (Part One) - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Continuing where we left off last week at the Frisco Heritage Center, I wanted to explore the Frisco Heritage Museum a little bit more as it had some great exhibits on the Railroad and its affect on the town of Frisco as well as some interesting artifacts. This week we'll just peak at the Covered Wagon and the Printing Press.

   
The first artifact sit right inside the back entrance to the museum complex - a covered wagon. It's similar to the ones that travelled to Frisco in the early 1900s which is surprisingly small considering a entire family's belongings would be piled inside of it.

The Frisco Journal (the local newspaper) began in 1902, the same year the town was founded. They have a really nice printing press and type setting storage cabinet.
There is a fun video uploaded by the museum on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B3IDYT8Frw which shows more information on the printing press.

Come visit next week when I showcase some additional artifacts in the museum.

Learn more by checking out the museum's official site - http://www.friscomuseum.com
And the Frisco Heritage Center website - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Word of the Week - Night Hawk - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Night Hawk - a rider who watches the horse herd (called a remuda) during the night

Also called a "night wrangler".

The wranglers who watched the cow herd during the night were called the "night guard". They usually worked in 2-4 hour shifts, singing to the cows to keep them calm.

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Center - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

One of my greatest pleasures is to travel to places that are either historical in nature or feature culture of an area. The Frisco Heritage Center in Frisco, Texas satisfies both of those. The Center features 8 historical buildings as well as a locomotive train, a working blacksmith workshop, and a two-story museum. Almost every third Sunday, the center hosts an open house with activities and guides (and is FREE except for the Museum). Plenty of free parking in the area.

The property itself sits on four acres right next to the BNSF (Burlington Northern Santa Fe) Railway and you will see in the back of the property a 1910 Steam Locomotive and a replica train depot. According to the Heritage Center's website, "Number 19 stands over 15’ tall, 64’ long and weighs in at 185,000 pounds" and is undergoing restoration.



Next to the train sits Gaby's Blacksmith Workshop complete with working forge, anvil, and benches to rest during demonstations. Gaby's workshop originally belonged to A.J. Gunstream and resided at the corner of Third and Main Streets in Frisco. J.T.Gaby bought it when Mr. Gunstream retired and renamed it. The shop was in operation until 1985. It's a large corrugated metal building (which gets pretty toasty in the summer months). There are demonstrations during the Open House and other events.



Near the front of the park resides a replica Log Cabin based on other cabins that may have existed in the area during the late 1800s.



The bright white building is the Lebanon Baptist Church from Lebanon, Texas, built in 1904 (after the congregation's first church was destroyed in a storm). Lebanon as a town disappeared when the railroad bypassed it (for Frisco). Surprisingly, the church was still in use until it was donated to the City of Frisco in 2003. The pews, tin ceiling and wooden floors are all original. This building is also available for party/event rental.



The Frisco Heritage Museum sits in front of the back parking lot and features the history and culture of Frisco in its early days. There is a nice covered wagon at the front entrance before you enter the museum itself. Great photo-op. Once you pay for your entrance, you enter the museum in the back and find an old-fashioned early 20th century car. Other exhibits include a printing press and "King Cotton" displays. Upstairs has a great presentation on the railroad (which may get moved to the railroad museum that is being constructed nearby) and a children's play area. A 1960's living room is tucked away in the back. For hours and ticket prices, check friscoheritage.org.




Learn more by checking out the office site - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Word of the Week - Necktie Party - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Necktie Party - a hanging

Cattle theft was reason enough for a hanging which might attract hundreds of viewers; some towns made hangings into a big spectacle and outing.

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Dallas Heritage Village (Part Six) - Dallas,Texas - #TravelTuesday

Welcome back to our tour around the Dallas Heritage Village in downtown Dallas, Texas. Last week we stopped at the Queen-Anne style Doctor's office, the Worth Hotel, and the Shotgun House. This is our final week at the village, wrapping up with the Depot and the General Store.

Railroad Depot:
This depot was built for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Line (MKT) in 1886 in Fate, Texas during the peak periods of railroad activity in Texas. Each railroad line had a designated color scheme and MKT's was green (which is hard to tell from my hazy picture).
  
     

General Store:
Our last stop on our little tour of the heritage village will be the Blum Brothers' General Store (on Main Street). Originally built by Albert Mueller in 1907 on Wolf St in Dallas, it was a typical style one large room building with a false-front outside (to make the building look taller/more prominent among several shops). According to the Visitor Guide, travelling salesman (known as "drummers" who drummed-up business for product companies) would sell their wares to these shopkeepers by showing samples and then the order would arrive by train. This store also has a post office inside of it.
     
Some of the shelves of goods:
           
Cash Register, Scales and Bins:
     

Well, that concludes our little walking tour of the Dallas Heritage Village. I hope you enjoyed it and learned a thing or two. Until next time!

For more information, please check out the DallasHeritageVillage.org
Interesting site for the MKT (also called Katy Line): KatyRailroad.org
A good picture of a typical MKT depot can be found on this site: KatyHeritageSociety.com
The Katy Depot in Sedalia, Missouri: KatyDepotSedalia.com

Western Word of the Week - Moss Head - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Moss Head - a very old steer

The average life expectancy for beef cattle is 8 to 12 years (if they weren't eaten before then).

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Dallas Heritage Village (Part Five) - Dallas,Texas - #TravelTuesday

Welcome back to our tour around the Dallas Heritage Village in downtown Dallas, Texas. Last week we stopped at the Neo-Classical Sullivan House and the lovely lavender Queen Anne style Blum House. This week we're taking a visit to the Doctor's office the Worth Hotel, and the Shotgun House. Next week will be our final week at the village, wrapping up with the Depot and the General Store.

Doctor's Office and Apothecary:
This Queen Anne style building was actually a residential home built in 1890, but is a good representation of what a person would have encountered visiting the local doctor. Compared to the Blum house, this one feels very tight and dark (and I apologize for the dark photos).
  
The Study:
     
Sitting Area/Waiting Room:
     
Exam/Operation Room:
        
Apothecary:
        

Worth Hotel:
The 1904 Worth Hotel was typical of the establishments built along railroad lines to accommodate traveling salesmen and other visitors. Not only did the hotel provide a bed but also a meal (for only 25cents!) According to the lovely lady who acted as our guide, most visitors preferred to stay with friends or relatives whereas traveling salesmen (called "drummers") went to towns where they may not know anyone.
  
Sleeping Areas:
     
Dining Room:
     

Shotgun House:
Shotgun Houses were small working-class homes built as a rectangle of rooms with a single pass-through hallway from front to back, separated by doors which meant little privacy. This particular house in the village came from Guillot Street and was rented for $10/month. Amazingly, it had electric wiring. There is an awesome African-American presentation posted on the walls of the house showing the history of Dallas and the culture.

              

For more information, please check out the DallasHeritageVillage.org
Additional information and a floor plan for Shotgun Houses can be found on Wikipedia.org