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Western Word of the Week - Drift Fences - #WesternWordoftheWeek #WesternWednesday

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...or, as I affectionately call it, Western Wednesdays!

Drift Fences - fences built near outlying boundaries of the ranch or range.

Source:
Cowboy Lingo by Ramon F. Adams; ISBN#0-618-08349-9

Western Travel - Heritage Farmstead Museum (Part Sixteen) - Plano, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Welcome to my weekly column #TravelTuesday featuring places I've discovered during my research trips or just wandering around in historical areas. I hope you enjoy my discoveries.

Last week we viewed some old-fashioned irons and a washing machine. Today we're going to continue our tour outside the Farrell-Wilson House.

 
On the back porch of the house, a large battery-powered generator was installed to keep the electricity in the house running during outages. As you can see, it required a lot of batteries to run. (Compare it to the modern-day battery attached to it now.)

 
Last week we saw the old-fashioned "washing machine" (two buckets) which would have required manual scrubbing using a washboard. Compare that to the newer version of the "washing machine" - a barrel that was electrically agitated.


A water pump and several types of buckets/tubs.


A small water tower.

Learn more by checking out the official site - www.heritagefarmstead.org/

boy's Heritage Farmstead Museum Physical Address: 1900 West 15th Street, Plano, Texas 75075 Phone Number: 972-881-0140 Hours: Tuesday-Sunday: 10am-4:30pm. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission: $3.00 per person (ages 3 and up) + $4 for tour of house

Historical Tidbit Thursdays - Return to Roanoke: Search for the Seven - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome to Historical Tidbit Thursdays. Once again, I'll be drifting off the usual Texas History research and exploring a fascinating piece of history - the Roanoke colony of Virginia. I hope you enjoy this peek into a mystery that so far is still largely unsolved.

The History Channel has several special programs spotlighting new finds in the Roanoke Colony mystery. This particular special had some interesting tidbits that other programs hadn't touched upon.

In 1607, The Virginia Company sent 3 ships to North America with the goal to colonize Virginia. They landed 120 miles from the Dare stone and founded Jamestown. The company also wanted to search for Roanoke survivors to gain their knowledge of the land and any metals they had found.

In the first year of Jamestown's founding, half of the colonists did not survive.



Captain John Smith, one of the members who landed, helped with the search for the lost colony (that had existed 20 years earlier). It had appeared their fort was disassembled and moved but there's no indication to where it had moved. John Smith was captured in an attack by the Powhatan Indians.



Friendly natives offered to guide the searchers down the river toward the lost colonists but would not touch the "foreign" land. John Smith had marked the lost colonists on a map called the Zuniga Map (above).

John Smith documented a lot of these events in his journals, but he greatly exaggerated his adventures making them not very reliable.

Next week we'll learn more about some of the artifacts that have been found and some of the people who'd lived here.

Source:
History Channel Special - Return to Roanoke: Search for the Seven (https://www.history.com/specials/return-to-roanoke-search-for-the-seven)

Photo Credits: Zuniga Map - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zuniga_map.jpg
Photo Credit: John Smith - http://www.history.com%2Ftopics%2Fjohn-smith&psig=AOvVaw3UMaMB57jA-FV3_IQTM_Ul&ust=1530297375655128

Western Word of the Week - Line Camps - #WesternWordoftheWeek #WesternWednesday

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...or, as I affectionately call it, Western Wednesdays!

Line camps - outpost cabins stationed along the "line" (boundary of a ranch or spread) where a cowboy or team could rest while they were "riding the line".

Also known as the "shack", "hooden", "Jones's place", "boar's nest"

Source:
Cowboy Lingo by Ramon F. Adams; ISBN#0-618-08349-9

Historical Tidbit Thursdays - Roanoke: A Mystery Carved In Stone - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome to Historical Tidbit Thursdays. Once again, I'll be drifting off the usual Texas History research and exploring a fascinating piece of history - the Roanoke colony of Virginia. I hope you enjoy this peek into a mystery that so far is still largely unsolved.



In 1587, 117 men, women and child landed on what would become Roanoke Island. Their original goal was to land in the Chesapeake Bay area. This area became what is known as the Roanoke Colony, the first permanent English colony or settlement in North America.

John White would be governor of this new colony. His daughter, Eleanor Dare, was pregnant during the journey to Roanoke. Her daughter, Virginia, was born August 18, 1587, the first English-born child in North America. Eleanor's husband, Ananias, had been a bricklayer (and stone cutter) in London.

The group voted for Governor John White to return to England for additional supplies, despite his misgivings of such a journey. When he arrived, England was at war with Spain and he was unable to return for 3 years. When he did return, all of the colonists were gone. There weren't any signs of a massacre or struggle. Where did the people go?

In 1937, a twenty-two pound inscribed stone was found 50 miles inland on the bank of the Chowan River in North Carolina. It had Old English lettering chiseled into it.

Over time, other inscribed stones have surfaced but many have been proven as fakes.

"Dare Stones" were those found with Eleanor Dare's initials or name chiseled into it. "E.W.D" stood for "Eleanor White Dare". The Brenau University has some "Dare Stones" that have been studied. The colonists had iron chisels capable for carving into stones.

Native American settlement near riverbank, about 50 yards from site where a Dare Stone was found. Had the colonists lived in this settlement?

A lot of archaeological digging is going on around the river and some pieces of English pottery have been found.

Source:
History Channel Special - Roanoke: A Mystery Carved in Stone

Western Word of the Week - Bronc Stall - #WesternWordoftheWeek #WesternWednesday

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...or, as I affectionately call it, Western Wednesdays!

Bronc Stall - a small, narrow enclosure for a wild horse (bronc) to calm down or a place to work on gentling his spirit

Source:
Cowboy Lingo by Ramon F. Adams; ISBN#0-618-08349-9

Western Travel - Heritage Farmstead Museum (Part Fourteen) - Plano, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Welcome to my weekly column #TravelTuesday featuring places I've discovered during my research trips or just wandering around in historical areas. I hope you enjoy my discoveries.

Last week we stopped in the downstairs Dining Room of the Farrell-Wilson House. Today we're going into the Bathroom.


This photograph from the Heritage Farmstead museum depicts the indoor bathrooms (installed in 1905) - something reserved for the wealthy at this time. What a showplace this must have been with indoor plumbing then later electricity. Look at that pretty peacock blue and green wallpaper! Notice the flushing mechanism on the toilet isn't quite modern (the handle is in an awkward place at seat-level).


A close-up of the porcelain bathtub and a few knickknacks along the window ledge.


On the opposite side of the bathroom, a tall changing box was set up (with a few period-style clothing pieces hanging from the top). A small round table and plush chair sits against the back wall for makeup application. A more modern curling iron (with plug) sits on the table top. Good view of the black and white floor tiles.

Learn more by checking out the official site - www.heritagefarmstead.org/

boy's Heritage Farmstead Museum Physical Address: 1900 West 15th Street, Plano, Texas 75075 Phone Number: 972-881-0140 Hours: Tuesday-Sunday: 10am-4:30pm. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission: $3.00 per person (ages 3 and up) + $4 for tour of house

Photo Credit of Staged Bathroom - https://www.heritagefarmstead.org

Historical Tidbit Thursdays - The Comanches - Clothing - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome back to our weekly blog - Historical Tidbit Thursdays!

This week I'm jumping back into our lessons on the Comanche people and today we'll take a look at their articles of clothing.



Warriors - normally only wore a breechclout (or loincloth) and moccasins. They might wear leggings painted blue and decorated with beads, the same with their moccasins or booties. For ceremonial purposes, they would wear a decorated buckskin shirt.

Women - wore long, full, fringed and decorated buckskin skirts and shirts.

Young girls - were naked except breechclouts (or loincloths).

Buffalo robes and fur hats were worn in winter to protect against the cold.

Source:
Comanches: The Destruction of a People by T.R.Fehrenbach; ISBN#0-306-80586-3


Photo Credit: By Elbridge Ayer Burbank(Life time: 1858-1949) - Original publication: 1897-U.S.AImmediate source: http://www.harvard-diggins.org/Burbank/Years/1897/1897_Chosequah.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26312263

Western Word of the Week - Stack-yard - #WesternWordoftheWeek #WesternWednesday

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...or, as I affectionately call it, Western Wednesdays!

Stack-yard - this is where piles of fresh hay was stacked (for use in the winter when there wasn't any grass for grazing)

Hay was also stored in straw-sheds.

Source:
Cowboy Lingo by Ramon F. Adams; ISBN#0-618-08349-9

Western Travel - Heritage Farmstead Museum (Part Thirteen) - Plano, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Welcome to my weekly column #TravelTuesday featuring places I've discovered during my research trips or just wandering around in historical areas. I hope you enjoy my discoveries.

Last week we stopped in the downstairs kitchen of the Farrell-Wilson House. Today we're going into the Dining Room.


Next to the Kitchen is the Dining Room. The dinner setting changes throughout the year/seasons. This photograph from the Heritage Farmstead museum features the more formal dinner settings.


When I visited, they had the unique pressed pattern glass (also known as Depression Glass for the era it was produced). Note the highchair in the back corner (with the glass of milk).


A mannequin wearing sack dress and white apron. Note the electric globe lights overhead.


Along the wall is the china cabinet that is filled with antique Chelsea Blue Grape semi-porcelain dinnerware from the early 1900s and a few pieces of other blue-white china.


A blurry photograph of the corner fireplace and mantel clock.

Learn more by checking out the official site - www.heritagefarmstead.org/

boy's Heritage Farmstead Museum Physical Address: 1900 West 15th Street, Plano, Texas 75075 Phone Number: 972-881-0140 Hours: Tuesday-Sunday: 10am-4:30pm. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission: $3.00 per person (ages 3 and up) + $4 for tour of house

Photo Credit of Staged Boy's Bedroom - https://www.heritagefarmstead.org

Historical Tidbit Thursdays - Texas Weather - Hail - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome to Historical Tidbit Thursdays. This week I'm veering off the normal historical path to investigate Texas weather, something that often plays a role in my stories.



Parts of Texas are plagued by hail storms which can cause lots of damage. In April 2016, San Antonio endured one of the costliest storm in recorded Texas history - up to $1.4 Billion in claims, which beat the previous record of $1.1 Billion in Fort Worth in May 1995. A lot of these storms just pop up with little warning.

How does hail form? During thunderstorms, updrafts (air currents from below) move upward to meet super-cooled water droplets. Technically there are 2 methods to form hail or hailstones (Wet and Dry Growth), but to keep it simple for this post, we'll just focus on Wet Growth. For Wet Growth, a small ice nucleus will form and as water droplets hit it, they get frozen to it and start forming a ball. As this ball gets heavier, it starts to fall gaining momentum and speed. It's possible for the ball to keep getting looped up through this system to add more layers of ice.

The largest hail stone ever recorded was in South Dakota - 8 inches diameter - on July 23, 2010.

For Texas, the largest recorded was 6 inches diameter - on June 12, 2010 in Moore County.

Typical hailstone sizes: Pea (1/4" diameter), Marble (1/2" diameter), Dime (3/4" diameter), Quarter (1" diameter), Golf Ball (1 3/4" diameter), Baseball (2 3/4" diameter), and Softball (4 1/2" diameter)

An interesting side-note about a town named Hail, Texas:
Between 1845 and 1850, a wagon train settled in an area of today's Fannin County. They built a school house, a church, then a grocery store, and in 1894 they acquired a post office. The people wanted to name the town Clarksville, after one of the founding couples, Elijah and Nancy Clark, but that name already existed in Texas. So the town's people wrote suggestions down and Elijah drew one from a hat - Hail (so named because of all the hail storms in this area).
Interested in learning more about Hail, Texas? Check out this site: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hrh05

References:
https://www.wunderground.com/prepare/hail
https://www.mysanantonio.com/business/local/article/San-Antonio-hail-storm-1-4-billion-in-losses-7269460.php

Photo Credit: http://mrcc.isws.illinois.edu/living_wx/hail/index.html

Western Word of the Week - Snortin-Post - #WesternWordoftheWeek #WesternWednesday

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...or, as I affectionately call it, Western Wednesdays!

Snortin'-Post - the hitching post or rack in front of a building to which a horse was hitched or tied.

Also called "hitchin' bar"

Source:
Cowboy Lingo by Ramon F. Adams; ISBN#0-618-08349-9