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Historical Tidbit Thursdays - The Comanches - Bow and Arrow Weapon - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome to our newest addition to the blog - Historical Tidbit Thursdays!

Today we're going to explore the very recognizable piece in a Native American's arsenal - the bow and arrow.


The wooden bow was vital to the Native American existence as it was a main tool in hunting food. The wood used depended on where the tribe/band was located. The Comanches used Osage orange, Hickory, or Bois d'arc wood. The Omaha Indians referred to Bois d'arc wood as "yellow wood" as it had a yellow tinge to it. A bow took a few days to a full month for a fancier version. Bow strings were typically made from horse tail hair.

Orange Osage
Hickory
Bois d'Arc

Arrows were considered prized possessions. Young Dogwood or mature Ash wood would be used for arrows. The wood was seasoned by fire for 10-14 days. Then it would be straightened. The shaft was polished and sometimes decorated with paintings or markings. Wild turkey, owl or buzzard feathers were used. Eagle or hawk feathers were not used (they had other purposes).


Before coming in contact with traders, Comanches created arrowheads of flint. Afterward, they preferred metal arrow points. A buckskin wristband was worn on left wrist to protect it from the "twang" of the bowstring. The bow and arrow were carried in a buckskin case hung over the right shoulder.


Bow and arrow was accurate up to 50 yards.


Source:
The Comanches: Lords of the South Plains by Ernest Wallace and E. Adamson Hoebel; ISBN#978-0806120409


Photo Credit - Osage Orange Tree - http://www.naturemuseum.org/Media/Default/Blog%20Photos/Andrew%20Wunschel/OsageTree230.jpg
Photo Credit - Bois d'Arc Tree - http://texasforestservice.tamu.edu/uploadedImages/Websites/Famous_Trees_of_Texas/Trees/Freedmen%27s%20Bois%20d%27Arc.jpg
Photo Credit - Hickory - http://texastreeid.tamu.edu/images/TreeImages/hickory_mocker150.jpg
Photo Credit - Bow and Arrow Sunset - https://comanchenationentertainment.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Little-Known-Facts-about-the-Comanche-Bow-Comanche-Nation-Entertainment.jpg
Photo Credit - Comanche Arrows - http://primitivepathways.com/image/cache/data/Bows/comanchearrows1-1280x720.jpg
Photo Credit - Comanche Arrow (Quanah Parker) - http://www.quanahparkertrail.com/Quanah_Parker_Trail/Arrow_List_files/shapeimage_5.png
Photo Credit - Carrying Case - http://media.liveauctiongroup.net/i/28726/25038866_2.jpg?v=8D3C09CB83B5820

Western Word of the Week - Range Boss - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Range Boss - Cowboy in charge of work in a particular area of range

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Museum (Part Four) - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Continuing where we left off last week at the Frisco Heritage Center, I wanted to explore the Frisco Heritage Museum a little bit more as it had some great exhibits on the Railroad and its affect on the town of Frisco as well as some interesting artifacts. This week we'll just peak at the Railroad exhibit temporarily housed in this museum (soon it will move to the Railroad Museum being built nearby).

The Dining Car - beautiful china and dedicated service
   

  Railroad Handcar - cranked by hand and could travel a section of track (10-30 miles) for track repairs, etc.

Pullman - antique luggage and trunks waiting for delivery

Come visit next week when I showcase some additional artifacts in the museum.

Learn more by checking out the museum's official site - http://www.friscomuseum.com
And the Frisco Heritage Center website - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Historical Tidbit Thursdays - The Comanches - The Tipi - #TidbitThursday

Howdy!

Welcome to our newest addition to the blog - Historical Tidbit Thursdays!

I'm really excited to be able to share my research, my favorite reference books, shows or movies I've seen that inspire, as well as my passion for history with you in a quicker and more regular way. My focus will be on my current WIP (Work in Progress) - a western romance fiction novel. So I hope you enjoy!!



Tipi: A typical tipi had twenty-two poles of cedar or pine wood about 10-20 feet long. 3 or 4 poles acted as the main framework that were tied together near the top and set upright like a tripod upon which the other poles were attached. Each pole was sharpened at the bottom to stick into the hard ground. 10-17 tanned buffalo hides were sewn together and lifted up with a single pole from inside the framework. This covering was then tied to the poles and staked to the ground (or if the ground was too hard or frozen, large rocks were used to hold it down). To keep the rain and drafts from coming inside, a lining of buffalo skin (later called a "dew cloth") was tied internally to the poles. Completed, the tipi was 12-15 feet in diameter and height. A ditch was dug around the outside to help water flow away from the tipi. In warm water, the cover and/or lining might be raised to let more cool air inside. The tipi was actually tilted backwards to allow a smoke-hole to be opened with flaps to allow smoke to escape but not let rain or wind inside. Women set up the tipi and could do it in 15 minutes.

Source:
The Comanches: Lords of the South Plains by Ernest Wallace and E. Adamson Hoebel; ISBN#978-0806120409


Tipi picture credit: https://comanchenationentertainment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Comanche-teepees-announce-the-birth-of-their-son.jpg
Diagram picture credit: https://www.coloradoyurt.com/cyc-content/uploads/2017/03/tipi-labeled-diagram-374x474.jpg

Western Word of the Week - Railheads - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Railheads - towns located at the "heads" of the railroad (at the end of the cattle drive) with facilities for loading cattle onto trains to be moved back East.

Also known as "cow towns".

By 1866s, lots of well-known railheads were in Kansas - Abilene, Wichita, and Dodge City to name a few.

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Museum (Part Three) - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Continuing where we left off last week at the Frisco Heritage Center, I wanted to explore the Frisco Heritage Museum a little bit more as it had some great exhibits on the Railroad and its affect on the town of Frisco as well as some interesting artifacts. This week we'll just peak at the some of the tools found around early 1900 farms and school items.


#1 - Cast Iron Corn Sheller - removed corn from the husks. #2 (on right) Water Pump.
#3 (left) scythe - used to reap the wheat or cut grass. #4 (middle) Badger Foot Corn-Cutter - cut the corn stalks as the farmer walked down the rows. #5 (right) Pressure Cooker - used to preserve the fruits and vegetables that were harvested to keep on a shelf for a long period.
#6 (back) Automatic canning machine - used with tin cans. #7 (front) Ball Jar - for preserving food.

Stuff for School including a Globe, Fountain Pen, Lunch Pail, and Slate.

Come visit next week when I showcase some additional artifacts in the museum.

Learn more by checking out the museum's official site - http://www.friscomuseum.com
And the Frisco Heritage Center website - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Museum (Part Two) - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Continuing where we left off last week at the Frisco Heritage Center, I wanted to explore the Frisco Heritage Museum a little bit more as it had some great exhibits on the Railroad and its affect on the town of Frisco as well as some interesting artifacts. This week we'll just peak at the exhibits concerning agriculture - milk and cotton. For those with small kids, the museum also has a nice play area on the second floor where they can pretend to farm.

 
Processing Milk and Cream on the Farm
How this gravity-separator contraption worked was about 5 gallons of milk were poured into the top-left container and cold water was added. The mixture sat for 3 hours or so, the cream rising to the top. The spigot was opened to allow the milk-water mixture to flow into the bucket underneath while the cream remained on the top. Just before the cream escaped, the spigot was closed and a new bucket was placed there to collect it.
The centrifugal-separator (the contraption on the right) worked by person-power. Two people cranked the handle on the top bucket fast enough to cause the cream to squirt out a higher spout while the heavier milk flowed out the lower spout. They could process 57.5 gallons/hour.
The wooden device in the bottom-left was a butter turn. Water mixed with milk was manually pumped to make first buttermilk then butter. Since it was covered, young children could be assigned this tedious task.
A bale of cotton.
A weaving machine.

Come visit next week when I showcase some additional artifacts in the museum.

Learn more by checking out the museum's official site - http://www.friscomuseum.com
And the Frisco Heritage Center website - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Word of the Week - Proddy - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Proddy - spoiling for a fight

Also called "on the prod".

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Museum (Part One) - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

Continuing where we left off last week at the Frisco Heritage Center, I wanted to explore the Frisco Heritage Museum a little bit more as it had some great exhibits on the Railroad and its affect on the town of Frisco as well as some interesting artifacts. This week we'll just peak at the Covered Wagon and the Printing Press.

   
The first artifact sit right inside the back entrance to the museum complex - a covered wagon. It's similar to the ones that travelled to Frisco in the early 1900s which is surprisingly small considering a entire family's belongings would be piled inside of it.

The Frisco Journal (the local newspaper) began in 1902, the same year the town was founded. They have a really nice printing press and type setting storage cabinet.
There is a fun video uploaded by the museum on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B3IDYT8Frw which shows more information on the printing press.

Come visit next week when I showcase some additional artifacts in the museum.

Learn more by checking out the museum's official site - http://www.friscomuseum.com
And the Frisco Heritage Center website - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Word of the Week - Night Hawk - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Night Hawk - a rider who watches the horse herd (called a remuda) during the night

Also called a "night wrangler".

The wranglers who watched the cow herd during the night were called the "night guard". They usually worked in 2-4 hour shifts, singing to the cows to keep them calm.

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7

Western Travel - Frisco Heritage Center - Frisco, Texas - #TravelTuesday

One of my greatest pleasures is to travel to places that are either historical in nature or feature culture of an area. The Frisco Heritage Center in Frisco, Texas satisfies both of those. The Center features 8 historical buildings as well as a locomotive train, a working blacksmith workshop, and a two-story museum. Almost every third Sunday, the center hosts an open house with activities and guides (and is FREE except for the Museum). Plenty of free parking in the area.

The property itself sits on four acres right next to the BNSF (Burlington Northern Santa Fe) Railway and you will see in the back of the property a 1910 Steam Locomotive and a replica train depot. According to the Heritage Center's website, "Number 19 stands over 15’ tall, 64’ long and weighs in at 185,000 pounds" and is undergoing restoration.



Next to the train sits Gaby's Blacksmith Workshop complete with working forge, anvil, and benches to rest during demonstations. Gaby's workshop originally belonged to A.J. Gunstream and resided at the corner of Third and Main Streets in Frisco. J.T.Gaby bought it when Mr. Gunstream retired and renamed it. The shop was in operation until 1985. It's a large corrugated metal building (which gets pretty toasty in the summer months). There are demonstrations during the Open House and other events.



Near the front of the park resides a replica Log Cabin based on other cabins that may have existed in the area during the late 1800s.



The bright white building is the Lebanon Baptist Church from Lebanon, Texas, built in 1904 (after the congregation's first church was destroyed in a storm). Lebanon as a town disappeared when the railroad bypassed it (for Frisco). Surprisingly, the church was still in use until it was donated to the City of Frisco in 2003. The pews, tin ceiling and wooden floors are all original. This building is also available for party/event rental.



The Frisco Heritage Museum sits in front of the back parking lot and features the history and culture of Frisco in its early days. There is a nice covered wagon at the front entrance before you enter the museum itself. Great photo-op. Once you pay for your entrance, you enter the museum in the back and find an old-fashioned early 20th century car. Other exhibits include a printing press and "King Cotton" displays. Upstairs has a great presentation on the railroad (which may get moved to the railroad museum that is being constructed nearby) and a children's play area. A 1960's living room is tucked away in the back. For hours and ticket prices, check friscoheritage.org.




Learn more by checking out the office site - www.friscoheritage.org/heritage-center/

Heritage Center Address: 6455 Page Street, Frisco, TX 75034

Western Word of the Week - Necktie Party - #WesternWordoftheWeek

Howdy!

Welcome to our Weekly Western Word of the Day...

Necktie Party - a hanging

Cattle theft was reason enough for a hanging which might attract hundreds of viewers; some towns made hangings into a big spectacle and outing.

Source:
The Cowboy Encyclopedia by Richard W Slatta; ISBN#0-87436-738-7